And the Noid Wins…Unfortunately


If you haven’t seen the Domino’s video of employee’s sticking pieces of cheese up their noses dominos_pizza_noid_19851and doing horrible things to food being used to make a sandwich, I wouldn’t. It’s disturbing and sickening.  It damages the brand to the core – consumers trust. 

“Nothing is local anymore,” Domino’s spokesman Tim McIntyre says. “That’s the challenge of the Web world. Any two idiots with a video camera and a dumb idea can damage the reputation of a 50-year-old brand.”

USA Today has provided commentary on the incident, but not from a financial or business standpoint.  A social media standpoint.  USA Today editorial provides the following advice to companies below. Complete article is here.

UPDATE: Jeremiah Owyang at Forrester adds Domino’s to his Punk’d by Social Media List: @jowayang web strategist.

USA Today interviewed some professionals and provided some best practices and learnings:

• Monitor social media. Big companies must actively watch Twitter, Facebook, YouTube and other social sites to track conversations that involve them. That will help uncover potential crises-in-the-making, says Brian Solis, a new-media specialist and blogger at PR2.0.

• Respond quickly. Domino’s responded within hours. “They responded as soon as they heard about it, not after the media asked, ‘What are you going to do?’ ” says Lynne Doll, president of The Rogers Group, a crisis-management specialist.

• Respond at the flashpoint. Domino’s first responded on consumer affairs blog The Consumerist, whose activist readers helped track down the store and employees who made the video. Then it responded on the Twitter site where talk was mounting. “Domino’s did the right thing by reinstituting the trust where it was lost,” Solis says.

• Educate workers. It’s important that all employees have some media and social-media training, says Ross Mayfield, co-founder of Socialtext, which advises companies on new media.

• Foster a positive culture. Workers who are content and customers who like your product are far less likely to tear down a company online, PR guru Katie Delahaye Paine says. “This would be a lot less likely to happen at places like Whole Foods.”

• Set clear guidelines. Companies must have clear policies about what is allowed during working hours — and what isn’t, Doll says. “It won’t prevent everyone from breaking the rules, but at least they’ll know what the rules are.”

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